Does Your Bathroom Faucet Need Replacing?

Saving money on your utilities is always a good deal! Doing your own Home Repairs can potentially save you hundreds of dollars a year.

Just by repairing a leaky faucet that only drips slightly can be a major savings. If that faucet is not repaired it can also cause major damage to your siding or foundation, and even undermine your home, causing major costly repairs.

Some times a faucet will just need a new washer or flow cartridge. Sometimes you will need to replace the entire fixture!

A typical bathroom or kitchen faucet replacement will take an hour or so.

Step 1

Identify the Type of Faucet You Already Have

There are three main faucet types available today: single hole, 4” triple hole, and 8” triple hole. In the single-hole faucet, the center control typically not only serves as the spout but the mixing valve as well. In the triple-holes faucets, the center device is usually just the spout with the mixing valves 4” or 8” from the center on each side respectively. Depending on your existing situation, the faucet may be installed to the countertop or the sink, so if you are replacing one or the other, you have the option to change faucet type. If not, purchase a new faucet to match the type you already have. The one exception would be that single-hole faucets can typically be used in a 4” triple-hole sink or countertop if they come with a blank base plate to cover the additional holes. One added benefit of separate mixing valves is that most manufacturers use one valve with many different trims. This will let you change the style in future with less waste and work. In our case, there was a 4” three-hole faucet installed to an integral sink cultured-marble top. Because we were also replacing the countertop and sink, we decided to go to a widespread 8” triple-hole faucet to match the new larger sink.

Step 2

Assemble the Parts

Once you have the new faucet picked out, assemble all the parts you need, and double check so you can complete this at one time and without multiple trips to the hardware store. Be sure to specifically check the fittings on the end of the faucet versus your existing water line extensions. Since it is an opportune time to replace the flexible lines, choose a set with an auto leak shut off. A small valve in the base of the line detects excess water flow and shuts off preventing further damage and flooding. If you are also replacing the sink drain, be sure to specifically check your P-trap setup in case any new o-rings or extensions are needed.

Step 3

Remove the Old Faucet

Start by shutting off the wall valves and turning on the faucet to drain down residual pressure. With a bucket handy, use an adjustable wrench to loosen and remove the flexible extension from the faucet. Drain the remaining water into the bucket. Next, remove the flexible line from the shutoff valve.

Step 4

Remove Hardware

Under the sink, there are typically nuts and washers securing the faucet. Remove any hardware in this area including the clamp bolt from the drain rod extension. Lift the faucet out from the top. It may need some gentle persuasion from years of corrosion or a sticky base gasket.

Step 5

Install New Faucet

Faucets can vary greatly among manufacturers, so consult your installation manual. The steps seen here will be generally applicable but might need modification for your particular setup. I find it helpful to mock assemble the part first to better visual what you will likely be feeling and not seeing when laying in a dark cabinet. Generally, from the top down there will be the spout, a gasket or plumber’s putty, the sink or countertop, a large washer or saddle, and a mounting nut. In this case plumber’s putty is called for instead of a gasket. If you’ve never worked with plumber’s putty before, imagine gray modeling clay. To use, take a small bit in the palm of your hand, and roll it back and forth until you form a 1/4” diameter rope. This putty is applied around the new spout base to prevent water splash from running into the cabinet. Install the center spout, and tighten the mounting nut from below with an adjustable wrench.

Step 6

Assemble Mixing Valves

If you are using a single-hole faucet, you will skip the next steps. Assemble the hot and cold mixing valves. In this case, a large nut and washer tightens the valve from below while a large washer and C-clip holds the valve at the top. Apply plumber’s putty to the sculpted bottom side of the top washer. Install the C-clip, and tighten the nut from below. Just as a reminder, the hot and cold valves are left and right respectively.

Step 7

Thread the Trim

For this faucet, the top trims are installed by threading onto the mixing valve. Make sure the handle is oriented parallel to the wall in the OFF position prior to threading the trim. Next, hook up the water lines from below. Luckily, this faucet features easy snap-end fittings. If yours uses threaded NPT fittings, be sure to use plumber’s tape on any connections not utilizing a rubber or gasket seal. Install the new water line extensions to the shut off and mixing valves.

Step 8

Reinstall Drain Rod

Finally, reinstall the drain rod to the extension, and tighten the clamp bolt. Double check all your fittings, and slowly turn ON the shut off valves one at a time. Look for leaks, and if all is well, test and flush the new faucet for two minutes.

Step 9

You’re Done!

While faucets tend to last a long time, they don’t always age well in the design department. Replacing your bathroom faucets can be a quick and rewarding project. Plus, if you choose ones with separate mixing valves and trims, you can more easily update the faucet in the future with less work and waste.

Thanks to Dylan Eastman for sharing this info. See the whole article at http://www.diynetwork.com/how-to/rooms-and-spaces/bathroom/how-to-replace-a-bathroom-faucet.

When Doing your own Home Repairs, it is always best to take some to to be prepared. Whether  it is just a washer replacement or the whole faucet, read the instructions and make sure you have all the tools you need to complete the project before you start.

Five Important Forms Of Maintenance That No Homeowner Should Ever Overlook

Home Maintenance

As a homeowner, there are a lot of things that you can do to control your ownership costs. Foremost among these is to practice diligent maintenance. Good property maintenance can prevent minor issues from spiraling out of control. It also give you the chance to spot potential problems and prevent them from ever occurring at all. The following are five things that every property owner should do to protect his or her investment.

Schedule a whole house plumbing inspection at least once per year. During these visits, plumbers walk through the entire house and search for signs of leaks that are hidden or slow. These might be hiding behind your appliances or your drywall. If they aren’t identified and resolved early on, they can cause a considerable amount of property damage.

In addition to preventing water damage, these inspections can also stave off problems with mold. Having unchecked moisture behind your walls can result in the proliferation of mold, mildew and other harmful organisms. Not only will these devalue critical building materials and structures, but they can also wreak havoc on the indoor air quality, which will be problematic for those with chronic respiratory issues.Image result for laundry room

Have major household appliances serviced. Slow and hidden leaks are most commonly caused by faulty appliance connections. A quick look at the related hoses and other attachments is a great way to protect your flooring and baseboards from preventable floods. Having your water pressure checked can also extend the lifetime of these investments by limiting the amount of wear and tear that they’re subjected to.

Invest in a home warranty that pays for various forms of maintenance assistance. Making sure that you have a feasible plan for taking care of essential upkeep is critical, especially if you are already overwhelmed by the costs of owning a home. These service agreements can be structured to pay for one to two routine visits from plumbers, electricians and appliance technicians among other contractors.

Have a professional landscaper check your backyard for fast-growing tree roots or weeds that could compromise your plumbing system. These can permeate clay pipes at the property exterior and cause whole-house back-ups. You can divert piping systems away from tree roots ad invasive weeds or you can switch dated, clay pipes out with more advanced materials.

Schedule a roofing inspection and annually and have your gutters and downspouts thoroughly cleaned at least twice per year. These efforts will keep your roofing substrate from being constantly subjected to standing pools of water during the wettest months of the year. Anything that you can do to keep water moving efficiently off of this surface will invariably improve its lifespan.

If you have any water features on your property, double check any safety measures that you’re using to ensure continued efficiency. If you don’t have pool fencing installed, make sure to get this critical barricade up to limit liability and check small children. Should one of these structures already exist, have it inspected by a licensed professional to identify any shortcomings or needed repairs.

For the most current info about the Absolut Custom Glass System, pay a visit to our web pages here today. Additional details are available at http://www.absolut.net.au/ now.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Diana_L_Spencer/1476913

 

How to Replace Your Kitchen Faucet

How to Replace Your Kitchen Faucet

In this article we will learn how to replace your kitchen faucet.

There are a few tools you will need to get this project accomplished.

  • An adjustable wrench or a set of open end wrenches.
  • Water pump pliers.
  • Set of deep socket wrenches.
  • A basin wrench may also be necessary to remove the old water lines depending on the faucet.

Many times the bolts holding the faucet in place will corrode and not want to come off, so spraying them with a penetrating oil beforehand will help, sometimes they will need to be busted off.

Here is a great video to help guide you through replacing your faucet.

 

Easily Repair Your Leaking Faucet.

Having a faucet that drips or runs when the handle is turned off can be annoying and also waste a lot of water and money.

We will show you  how you can easily repair your leaking faucet.

There are many brands of faucets these days, both with 2 handle and single handle styles.

Most Faucets built in the past 30 years use a cartridge system that opens and closes to allow water to flow.

Changing these cartridges is a fairly simple process as you can see from the video below.

One thing to keep in mind, if you know the manufacturer and model of your faucet it will be much easier to get a replacement. Some cartridges come with a lifetime warranty, so check with the manufacturer before spending money to buy one!

Here is a video on how to remove the cartridge by: http://www.homefrontstan.com.

Now the you have your new cartridge, go to page 2 to see how to properly install it.

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