Adding More Garage Storage

Having a garage to store things is awesome. And it doesn’t really matter how big it is – it can always use more storage.

Building shelves or storing stuff in bins can be a great option. The issue with these types of storage is that your belongs are not visible or easy to locate when you want them.

Taking some time to build shelving that rolls out so you can find things is a great option.  Really!

This shelving unit from Family Handyman will make very efficient use of the space you have in your garage.

Starting with Pocket door rollers, let’s see how much extra storage we can get.

 

The heart of the system is a series of double-sided rollout shelves that allow easy access to everything that can be stored in a narrow space. With these rollouts, you don’t have to store your paint cans, nails, screws and other stuff four layers deep and then shuffle everything around to find what you’re looking for. When the shelves are pulled out, everything is in full view and easily accessible. Plus, the garage looks neat and tidy when the shelves are pushed back in.Don’t worry if you’ve also got some large items to store. The 16-ft.-long top shelf is 32 in. deep to hold big storage containers, and there’s a 3-ft.-wide section of 16-in.-deep shelves for medium-size items. The storage unit is 16 ft. long, 84 in. tall and 16 in. deep.

The cost of the materials for this project is about $800. If you want to save some money and don’t require as much narrow storage space, just reduce the number of rollout shelves. Each rollout, including hardware, costs about $75.

Expect to spend three or four days building this project. It’s not complicated or difficult, but there are a lot of parts to cut out and assemble. For the most part, we used standard carpentry tools, but we used a table saw to cut the particleboard and a biscuit joiner and pocket screw jig to assemble the rollouts and bypass unit. The latter tools are optional, though. You can cut parts with a circular saw, but it’ll take longer and won’t be as accurate. And you can substitute screws and glue for the biscuit joints. You can also nail through the face of the cabinets to secure the divider rather than use pocket screws.

The particleboard and framing lumber you’ll need are available from home centers and most lumberyards. The bypass door track and three-wheel rollers we used to support the shelves may be hard to find locally, but you can order them online at johnsonhardware.com. You can also buy the shelf standards and leg levelers online at wwhardware.com.

Sliding storage = More convenience, more space

The rollout shelves provide better access and make small stuff easier to find. They’re versatile, too. You can set the divider wherever you want to create different-depth shelves.

The bypass unit adds 50 percent more storage for long-handled tools and all sorts of items that take up too much wall space. You simply slide it to either side to access the stuff behind.

Sports gear

Sports gear

Supplies

Supplies

Map it out on the wall

Mark the location of the top shelf and columns on the wall before you start building (Photo 1). This allows you to check for obstructions and double-check the height of the columns. Start by deciding where the endpoints for the 16-ft. storage unit will be. If you have leeway, you could adjust the position so that the end columns land over wall studs, but it’s not necessary.

Next, use a level to see if the garage floor slopes. Measure 81 in. up from the highest point on the floor and mark the wall. Draw a 16-ft. level line across the wall from this point. We used a laser level to establish level reference points on each end of a 16-ft. line, and measured up from these points to mark the endpoint of the horizontal layout line. Then we snapped a chalk line between these points to indicate the bottom edge of the shelf and the top of the columns. You could also use a line level or step a 4-ft. level across the wall to mark the level line.

If your garage floor slopes more than 1-1/2 in. from one end of the unit to the other, you’ll have to build some of the columns a little taller. Check this out by measuring down from the level line at each end. Finally, using Figure B as a guide, carefully mark the location of the wall cleats that anchor each column, and draw plumb lines down from each mark (Photo 1). Now you’re ready to build the columns and wide shelf.

Check out the complete set of instructions for this great project at Family Handyman.

Getting Your Garage Organized!

Leaving your car out in the elements can be costly, damage to the paint from the suns rays, tree sap, hail or other things mother nature may throw at it, yet it’s estimated that 70 percent of us don’t park our cars in our garage. The number one reason for this, we have too much other stuff in there. Getting your garage organized can be a big project. With help from this guide you may find it easier than you would have thought.

 

The Big Clean-Out: Getting Started

• Set aside at least a full day, or even a full weekend or two, to get the job done.
• Make decluttering a family project and invite over a few friends to pitch in, and it’ll go a lot faster.
• Go through absolutely everything, including boxes you didn’t unpack when you moved in—you never know where that family heirloom might be lurking.
• Sort all items into three piles: keep, donate or sell, and toss. Lay them on dedicated tarps or mark off areas of your driveway with chalk and place them there. What should get the boot: outgrown toys, items that are broken beyond repair, expired household chemicals (which may need special disposal), and anything you haven’t used in two years or more. If you have a hard time letting go of things that have sentimental value, snap pictures as keepsakes.
• Sort the keepers into broad categories (for example, sports equipment, hand tools), and place them in well-marked cardboard boxes or, better yet, stackable clear-plastic bins you can use later. Put the keepers back in the garage for now.
• As soon as possible, donate giveaways and schedule a yard sale to get rid of castoffs.

Draft a Floor Planorganize-garage 2

Most manufacturers of garage-organizing systems offer free space planning, so use their services as you research how to store all your gear. Before buying anything, take down your garage’s dimensions and note the size and location of windows, doors, switches, and receptacles, as well as how much space your car takes up. Then use the following rules of thumb as you assign things a home.
1. Items you use together, such as gardening tools and lawn chemicals, should be stored close to one another.
2. Put bulky equipment, like lawn mowers, in corners, where they won’t get bumped or knocked over by your car.
3. Place frequently used items, like bikes, close to the garage door.
4. Stash seasonal or rarely used items in the hardest-to-reach spots.
Read the complete guide at Thisoldhouse.com