Fall Lawn Care – It Really is the Best Time

Fall is a great time to repair your lawn and prepare it for the harsh winter to come. While it may be dormant  to the eye, the root structure of your lawn is still at work.

Fall lawn care is one of the best things you can do to provide for a healthy root system BS and improve the soil quality — just cover these basic rules.

Now is the time to work to control winter weeds with an application of pre-emergent. If you are over-seeding for the winter, do not apply a pre-emergent herbicide because it will hinder the germination of your turf’s seed.

Feeding your lawn with an even application of fertilizer is the best thing you can do to boost a strong spring growth. A 3-1-2 mix is a safe bet but be cautious not to over apply. Try to apply fall fertilizer 2 to 4 weeks before the first frost and always water-in after an application of fertilizer. To ensure you have a proper fertilizer mix, test your soil with an over-the-counter testing kit available from your local garden supply. Or take a test soil sample to your local Agri life extension agent for testing.

Select slow release organic fertilizer for the soil and sod but if you have questions then contact your local garden supply professionals. When applying, follow all instructions on the packaging and water-in as recommended. This is the best way to prepare for cool weather dormancy and protect against winter kill. Water your entire lawn ½ inch per week if rainfall is lacking. Use a moisture meter at root level to measure the amount of moisture in your soil.

Don’t scalp your lawn in the fall, leave it at least 2 inches high, this may vary depending on the grass variety. Continue to mow as long as your lawn is growing.

Make sure your mower blade is sharp and do a little maintenance before putting it away for the winter.

Part of fall lawn care is taking care of fallen leaves. If left on the lawn, leaves can form a wet blanket, smothering your turf and promoting disease. Keep leaves raked and picked up and use them in a compost pile. A small amount of leaves can be mowed and mulched into the lawn.

If you have areas where grass just won’t grow then the fall is a great time for planting and establishing certain groundcover plants.

Remember if you put your lawn to sleep healthy it will wake up healthy in the spring!

 

Check out the wonderful video below for more fall lawn tips and fertilizing.

 

Spring Maintenance, Remember Your Lawn.

Your Lawn

Now that the weather has turned nice and temperatures are rising, it is time to get outdoors and spruce up your home with a little spring maintenance. There are many projects to accomplish, but don’t forget to take care of the lawn so it turns thick and green for everyone to enjoy all summer long.

Even though you cleaned up all the leaves and debris in the fall, there’s still work to be done now that spring is here. Before you break out the rake to clean up the leaves, old clippings, evergreen needles, and whatever else has accumulated over the winter, be sure the soil is well dried.  Foot traffic and heavy raking a lawn that is still soggy can compact the soil and damage tender, new grass shoots.

Now that you have your lawn cleaned and raked, there are more things to do to help your grass grow and thrive. Here are some great tips from todayshomeowner.com

Seeding and Planting
In the spring, gardeners have to choose between weed control and lawn seeding. Pre-emergent herbicides prevent grass seed from sprouting too, so you can’t do both – the herbicide will be active for up to 12 weeks, which means you’ll miss the spring planting season.

If your focus this spring is on filling in bare spots or establishing a new lawn, time your activities according to the type of grass:

Cool-season grasses can be planted as soon as the air temperatures get into the 60’s and soil temperatures are in the 50’s. Plant as soon as temperatures allow to give the seedlings a chance to get established before hot weather hits. Fall is a better time to plant cool-season grasses, so use spring planting for patching bare spots, and be prepared to keep your lawn well-watered during the summer.
Warm-season grasses can be planted when air temperatures are in the 70’s, soil temperatures are in the 60’s, and all danger of frost has passed. Late spring is the best time to plant warm-season grasses.

Controlling Weeds
Spring is the best time to prevent weeds by using pre-emergent weed control, which works by preventing weed seeds from germinating. Your first application of a pre-emergent herbicide should occur just as the forsythia bushes finish blooming in spring – that should stop crabgrass and other weeds before they have a chance to grow.

Both cool-season and warm-season lawns benefit from weed prevention in the spring. Pre-emergent herbicides work for about three months, so plan on a second application during the summer.

Fertilizing
The type of grass you have also influences when and how you should fertilize your lawn:

Cool-season grasses: Resist the urge to heavily fertilize your lawn in the spring. Spring feeding encourages rapid tender growth that will struggle to survive the heat of summer, particularly in drought-prone areas. If your lawn is in bad shape, fertilize lightly in spring with a balanced, slow-release fertilizer. Save the heavier feedings for fall, when cool-season grasses are at their peak growing season.
Warm-season grasses: Fertilize in late spring as soon as the lawn “greens up” and begins actively growing. This is usually in April or May, after the last frost.

Article Source: todayshomeowner.com

If you notice large brown patches in your lawn you may have an insect problem that will need to be dealt with fairly quickly to keep them from destroying the whole yard.